Who Should Create Content in Your Company?

Who Should Create Content in Your Company?

Content marketing is over 100 years old, but has only recently risen to prominence among big and small companies alike. Although traditional advertising still dominates the budget for most businesses, content marketing is starting to pick up steam as a viable way to acquire new customers and retain existing ones.

There are many reasons for this, but top among them is the idea that content marketing speaks to consumers wherever they may be in the buying cycle. If you can envision a purchase decision as a continuum along a line with the end point being the decision to buy, you’ll see that lots of other things are happening in the background as your potential customer is deciding on whether or not to purchase. Your prospect is gathering as much info as she can about your industry, the solutions available to her, checking out reviews, making cost comparisons, and other doing other research before ever deciding on whether to buy or not.

This creates an enormous opportunity for you to meet your buyer wherever he or she may be in the process. And the earlier you can make a connection with timely, relevant, and useful content, the better.

Who Has Time for That?

So, we know delivering content is important, but the biggest question in today’s environment is who exactly, is going to do it. Many companies are already stretched thin on time and additional resources. But, this is where having a solid content production plan in place can work wonders.

Someone in your company – whether that’s someone in-house or someone you contract to do so – should manage the process of content production. That doesn’t mean, however, that this person should be wholly responsible for producing it. That job should be placed on the shoulders of everyone involved. That includes owners, managers, employees, and even vendors and contractors.

Your Content Marketing Team

Because everyone in your company has job-specific duties, it stands to reason that those people are more qualified to speak about those areas than anyone else in the company. And they should not only be allowed to, but encouraged to.

If you own a small micro-brewery for example, it’s fine to have the CEO blog about the passion he has for the product. But, it should also be fine to interview those intimately involved in the process and create videos, tweets, and Instagram photos of how their beer is made. You shouldn’t just be going vertically in your search for content, but also horizontally across departments.

A YouTube channel interviewing key employees or vendors can be used. Allowing employees to Snapchat their followers while at work can be a part of it. Obviously you have to set some parameters in place and it won’t always be appropriate to do so, but in today’s market you have to be more open to the impact of social, not less. Don’t fight it, leverage it. We can no longer just relegate content production to the marketing team. It has to be a joint effort across the board.

By encouraging everyone in the company to participate and create content a rising tide will lift all boats. Trying to create enough content will no longer be a concern. Getting everyone on board will give you more than you could ever use.

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